en

19 March 2018 - 23 March 2018

Harnessing mining for sustainable development

19 March 2018 - 23 March 2018

Harnessing mining for sustainable development

Harnessing mining for sustainable development

Course Information

19 March 2018 - 23 March 2018

English

Turin Centre

Code: A9011199

Deadline: 10 March 2018

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In many developing economies, the mining sector plays an important role in terms of economic growth, infrastructure development, skills development and job creation. Questions remain: how to further integrate the mining sector at the national level into the framework of sustainable development? How to maximize the positive impacts of mining on sustainable development, while reducing or mitigating the related negative consequences? What spillover effects can be created in sectors such as tourism, agriculture or construction, contributing to overall development in line with national priorities? These and other questions will serve as starting points for discussion and knowledge exchange. Course objectives also include preparing participants to utilize checklists and other tools when reviewing mining plans and ongoing operations to assess sustainable mining practices, to identify areas in need of improvement, and to make recommendations for change.

Description

Description

In many developing economies, the mining sector plays an important role in terms of economic growth, infrastructure development, skills development and job creation. Questions remain: how to further integrate the mining sector at the national level into the framework of sustainable development? How to maximize the positive impacts of mining on sustainable development, while reducing or mitigating the related negative consequences? What spillover effects can be created in sectors such as tourism, agriculture or construction, contributing to overall development in line with national priorities? These and other questions will serve as starting points for discussion and knowledge exchange. Course objectives also include preparing participants to utilize checklists and other tools when reviewing mining plans and ongoing operations to assess sustainable mining practices, to identify areas in need of improvement, and to make recommendations for change.

Target Audience

Target Audience

Public and private sector professionals involved in planning, developing, overseeing or managing mining activities, including quarries and natural resources (particularly if concerned with aspects of local economic development, Sustainability and Corporate social responsibility, life-cycle management, environmental management of mining, and the labour and skills-related dimensions of mining).
This course will also be beneficial for workers' organizations in the mining sector, business associations that are directly or indirectly linked to the mining sector (e.g. construction, tourism, agriculture), civil society organizations active in the area of sustainable development and mining, ILO and UN staff involved in technical cooperation programmes in sectors such as tourism, rural development or construction.

Objectives

Objectives

General objective

The objective is to build on basic concepts of sustainable development as they apply to mining.Participants will strengthen their skills necessary to understand and evaluate the socio-economic environmental consequences of mineral production and their relationship to biotic resources and the environment. Participants will also know about some of the practical processes/methods of how to better leverage mining operations for sustainable development and avoid some of the most important pitfalls.

 Specific objectives

At the end of the course, participants will have:

  • Foundational knowledge about the socio-economic environmental characterisation of mineral resources;
  • a basic understanding of resource management issues;
  • understanding about what is meant by sustainable development and how sustainability concepts are applied to mining;
  • the ability to utilize check lists and other tools when reviewing mining plans and ongoing operations to assess sustainable mining practices of an operation, to identify areas in need of improvement, and make recommendations for change;
  • an understanding of how to promote decent work and employment creation within the context mining activities.

Content

Content

The course will consist of three modules plus practice/ group exercises:

 1. Placing mining within the sustainable development framework

  • Brief history of sustainable development leading to reiteration of key sustainability principles, followed by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • Sustainable development applied to mining, leading to a more in-depth discussion of sustainable mining practices (SMP), mining policy vs. sustainable mining policy, and the distinction between SMP and mining’s contribution to sustainable development
  • Indicator concepts, GRI, SDGs indicators for mining
  • Prevention of environmental disasters

  2. Environmental dimension of sustainable mining

  • Life Cycle Thinking (LCT) and Assessment (LCA) in the toolbox for sustainability assessment
  • LCT in product policy and in minerals policy; LCT in SDGs
  • Basics of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and the role of LCA to help governments determine if a mine plan will be consistent with sustainable management practice
  • LCA data needs and case studies of LCA applied to mining / raw materials

 3. Social / economic dimension of sustainable mining

  • Sector perspective on decent work in extractive industries: good practices and case studies
  • Local economic development and employment creation in mining and extractive industries
  • Occupational safety and health in small scale mining
  • Consultation and participation of indigenous peoples and guidance provided by ILO Convention 169 on indigenous and tribal peoples

Format and Methodology

Format and Methodology

The course will take a highly participatory approach which requires full involvement by all participants and ensures exchange of information and experiences. Training methods will include: presentations (face-to-face and/ or by videoconference), group work, plenary discussions, and other interactive elements. Participants will also be actively engaged in individual or group activities in order to consolidate the concepts discussed during classes and develop the related understandings and skills.

Language requirements

Language requirements

The course will be conducted in English. Hence a good knowledge of the working language is required.

How to apply

How to apply

The deadline for submission of candidatures is 10 March 2018.  

Candidates must submit through the website the following documents:

• on-line application form duly filled in, available at: http://intranetp.itcilo.org/STF/A9011199/en 

• letter from the sponsor indicating financial support (or letter from the applicant stating that participation cost is covered by himself/herself), to be uploaded when filling in the on-line application Incomplete applications will not be considered.

For information regarding payment, cancellation and refunds, please consult: http://www.itcilo.org/en/training-offer/how-to-apply

As an Organization dedicated to promoting social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights, the ILO is taking a leading role in international efforts to foster gender equality. In line with this ILO focus, women are particularly encouraged to apply to ITCILO courses.

Information and Costs

Information and Costs

The total cost of participation is 2215 euros. This includes tuition fees (1600 Euro) and subsistence costs (615 Euro).

• The tuition fees cover: course preparation, implementation and evaluation; training materials;

the use of training facilities and support services.

• Subsistence costs cover: full board and lodging on the Centre’s Campus, emergency medical insurance

and some recreational activities in Turin.

The figures quoted do not include the cost of travel between the participant’s home country and the course venue.

Participants must ensure that they have a valid passport and appropriate visa for Italy, and for any country in which a transit or stopover to or from the course venue is required.

The cost of the visa, airport taxes, internal travel in the participant’s home country and unauthorized stopovers is not covered.

Tuition cost: 1600

Subsistence cost: 615

Total cost: 2215

 

International Training Centre of the ILO

Viale Maestri del Lavoro, 10
10127 Turin - Italy

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