Master in Applied Labour Economics for Development

This master responds to the need for more diverse expertise in the design and evaluation of policies in which international labour standards and fundamental rights at work go hand-in-hand with job creation and productive employment. It is intended to prepare participants to become experts in designing, analysing and evaluating policies that place employment at the heart of economic, social and development policy-making. The course will combine rigorous training in analytical and quantitative economic methods with an emphasis on what constitutes an appropriate policy, the legal and institutional framework for employment and decent work in different development contexts.

Master in Applied Labour Economics for Development

Deadline for application: 03 September 2017

Starting date: 23 October 2017

English

23 October 2017 - 31 December 2018

Blended

Master Information

Deadline for application: 03 September 2017

Starting date: 23 October 2017

English

23 October 2017 - 31 December 2018

Blended

Module B

Labour standards, policies and institutions

  • Labour market institutions - Sher Verick (ILO)
  • Social security - Christina Behrendt (ILO)
  • Minimum wages - Uma Rani Amara and Rosalia Vazquez-Alvarez (ILO)
  • Trade and employment development - To be defined

 

Labour market institutions

Drawing on the literature, empirical evidence and policy debates, this module aims to expose participants to the theories that underpin the discussions on labour market institutions and policies and the empirical evidence on their impact. The lectures places these dimensions in a development context: What regulations exist in developing countries? How relevant are these regulations for developing countries? What is their impact on economic and labour outcomes? How can institutions and policies in developing countries be more effective in terms of worker protection and providing the right conditions for employers? 

The topics covered in the course include:

  • Overview and history of labour market institutions (LMIs)
  • The impact of LMIs: theory and empirical evidence
  • LMIs in developing countries
  • Active labour market policies (ALMPs): what role and impact in developing countries?

Social security

This module aims at introducing students to recent developments in social security / social protection in a development context. It will discuss the importance of social protection for economic and social development, namely with regard to employment and labour markets, review current trends and country experiences, and discuss different policy approaches, including the ILO approach to extending social security coverage through nationally-defined social protection floors as part of comprehensive social protection systems. Highlighting the link with employment policies, the module will also assess the role of social protection in facilitating transitions from the informal to the formal economy, in line with ILO Recommendations No. 202 and 204. The module will also situate social protection policies within the broader Sustainable Development Agenda, namely in relation to SDGs 1, 3, 5, 8 and 10 on poverty eradication, gender equality, inclusive economic growth and employment, and inequality.

This module aims at:

  • Discussing the importance of social protection for economic and social development
  • Reviewing current trends in social protection, promising country experiences and current policy debates
  • Assessing the role of social protection in facilitating transitions from the informal to the formal economy, in line with ILO Recommendations No. 202 and 204
  • Brainstorming on new perspectives with regard to social protection in the context of the SDGs

The expected results through this module are:

  • deeper knowledge about recent trends and country experiences in social protection
  • better understanding of social protection policy approaches and the role of social protection in economic and social development.

Minimum wages

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of minimum wage policies that are practical in nature (the theoretical background of a minimum wage will not be addressed in this course) with the view to emphasise what tools are required in effectively setting and monitoring a minimum wage policy. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of which tools and what methodology is required for setting and adjusting a minimum wage, considering different economic contexts and the reality of specific sub-groups in the population. The second part will provide students with an understanding of how to monitor and evaluate a minimum wage policy as well as to assess the effect (the impact) of a minimum wage policy on outcomes that are important at the macro and micro-economic level (employment, poverty, inequality, compliance, prices, among others). 

The course is divided in two days. Each specific day/session is accompanied with a reading list, students are also strongly encouraged to review the following source below “The Minimum Wage Policy Guide”, which provides valuable insights about minimum wage setting, its adjustment, etc.:

Trade and employment development

Students will be introduced to the trade topic, with a particular focus on the theory of comparative advantage and the gains from trade - "The Ricardian model"; trade and income distribution - the Heckshor Oholin and the specific factors models; economies of scale, monopolistic competition and “new” trade theory; offshoring and trade in tasks: the search for new “new” trade theory.

International Training Centre of the ILO

Viale Maestri del Lavoro, 10
10127 Turin - Italy

Contact us