Promoting gender equality through social dialogue

Promoting gender equality through social dialogue

Promoting gender equality through social dialogue

15–26 May 2023
The course is available in English
Introduction to the course

Although the reality of gender equality in social dialogue is multifaceted, a common feature is the persistently low participation of women in related forums. ILO national and comparative studies confirm this democratic deficit at all levels and forms of social dialogue around the world. This trend is undoubtedly a reflection of women's under-representation in governments, trade unions and employers' organizations. Such low levels of women's participation may also explain the paucity of discussion and initiatives relating to gender equality in social dialogue institutions. Social dialogue and gender equity are core values and cross-cutting issues for the International Labour Organization (ILO). Indeed, social dialogue is a recognized governance tool for the promotion of equality between women and men at work. The issue of gender equality in social dialogue can be examined from a dual perspective: by considering quantitative data on the participation of men and women in national social dialogue institutions, and by looking at qualitative data reflecting the substance of the debate on gender equality and the measures agreed and/or implemented by governments and/or social partners. This course aims to build the capacity of constituents to promote gender equality in the various forms of social dialogue. Its will therefore contribute to the inclusion of these issues in the social dialogue agenda and to the achievement of agreements aimed at promoting gender equity in the world of work, in keeping with the UN's SDG 5. To this end, we will use new training methodologies, including a toolbox for labour relations that enables participants to intervene in an interactive way and concretely reflect and practice approaches to social dialogue and gender equality.

Who attends this course?

Representatives of government, workers and employers engaged in the various forms of social dialogue; professionals in the field of labour relations and employment from the public and private sectors; human resources and labour relations managers and staff of human resources departments dealing with labour relations and employment; labour administration and labour inspection officials; staff of the ILO and other international organizations; trainers, consultants and researchers in labour law and issues related to the promotion of gender equity in the world of work.

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