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19 November 2018 - 23 November 2018

Violence and Harassment in the World of Work: what to do?

19 November 2018 - 23 November 2018

Violence and Harassment in the World of Work: what to do?

Violence and Harassment in the World of Work: what to do?

Course Information

19 November 2018 - 23 November 2018

English - French

Turin Centre

Code: A9011182

English

Enrolment deadline: 28 October 2018

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Description

Description

Violence and harassment at work are a matter of serious concern for the ILO. This workshop will familiarize participants with the latest ILO research and experience on how this critical topic can be prevented and addressed by law, policy and practice.

Target audience

Target audience

Representatives from Ministries of labour, workers' and employers' organizations, gender equality machineries, aid organizations, UN organizations, women's NGOs, multi-stakeholder initiatives, HR departments.

Background

Background

Violence in the world of work is a threat to the dignity, security, health and well-being of everyone. It has an impact not only on workers and employers, but also on their families, communities, economies and society as a whole. Indeed, violence in the world of work strikes at the heart of the efforts of the International Labour Organization (ILO) to promote the right of all human beings "to pursue both their material well-being and their spiritual development in conditions of freedom and dignity, of economic security and equal opportunity" (Declaration of Philadelphia), II(a), 1944).

In 2015, the ILO highlighted the issue of violence during the 104th Session of the International Labour Conference (ILC), both in the resolution concerning the recurrent discussion on social protection (labour protection), and in Recommendation No. 204. This issue is, likewise, central to the ILO's centenary initiative on women at work. The adoption of a new international instrument to protect women and men workers from violence and harassment is now on the agenda for discussion of the 2019 International Labour Conference.

Gender-based violence (GBV) is described as the most systematic and widespread human rights violation in the world. Such violence is exceptionally dehumanizing, pervasive and oppressive, and both reflects and reinforces inequalities between women and men.  Gender-based violence was first addressed in 1979 at a global level under the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Article 11 requires that: “take all appropriate measures to eliminate discrimination against woman in the field of employment”. The issue today a global level priority: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development calls for the achievement of full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, the reduction of inequalities and the elimination of “all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres” (Target 8.5, Goal 10 and Target 5.2).   This includes tackling gender-based violence and disseminating tools to prevent and eliminate sexual harassment in the world of work.

Content

Content

Questions addressed in the course will include:

  • What is “violence” in the world of work?
  • What are the rights-based and business cases for tackling violence in the world of work?
  • What is “gender-based violence”?
  • What are the root causes? What are the risk factors for both victims as well as perpetrators of such violence?
  • Strategies, good practices and practical tools that exist to address this problem within the workplace and beyond?
  • Gender-based violence,  HIV and AIDS and other intersectional dimensions;

Experts will share innovative initiatives and instruments, including lessons learned in overcoming challenges. 

Objectives

Objectives

By the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

  • Identify entry points for addressing violence in the world of work,  from a gender perspective;
  • Develop arguments to promote violence-free workplaces;
  • Increase women workers’ voice and encourage men as advocates to stop such violence;
  • Use selected methodologies to help workers, managers and supervisors reduce sexual harassment in the workplace;
  • Design strategies to prevent and address GBV at work through multi-stakeholder partnership, gender-sensitive social dialogue, collective bargaining and other sensitization and awareness-raising actions;
  • Define the key steps for establishing a company level sexual harassment policy.

Format and Methodology

Format and Methodology

Training methods will include presentations by ILO and Turin Centre specialists and from invited external lecturers. They will also include individual and group learning activities and case studies under the guidance of highly qualified specialists in thematic fields, gender issues and learning methodology. Participants and facilitators will work in a highly participatory environment.  Country/thematic group work, brainstorming and discussions will complement presentations, with a view to stimulating participants’ ability to link concepts and data to their own work and life experience.

Participants' Profile

Participants' Profile

Policy-makers, national and local public services staff involved in human resource management and gender equality; civil society representatives interested in doing advocacy work and raising awareness of violence against women in the world of work; governments’, employers' and workers' representatives wishing to ensure a safe working environment for men and women.

Language requirements

Language requirements

The course will be delivered in English and French

How to apply

How to apply

Cost of participation
The total cost of participation is 2,215 euros. This includes tuition fees (1,600 euros) and subsistence costs (615 euros).
The tuition fee includes:
  • tuition;
  • books and other training materials;
  • course preparation, implementation and evaluation.
The subsistence cost includes:
  • full board and lodging at the Turin Centre’s campus;
  • emergency medical insurance;
  • socio-cultural activities.
The cost of participation does not include the cost of travel between the participant’s home country and the course venue. Participants must ensure that they have a valid passport and appropriate visa for the country in which the course
is held and for any country in which a transit or stopover to or from the course venue is required.

Applications

The deadline for candidatures is 19 October, 2018

Applications should be submitted on-line through the Web Site: http://intranetp.itcilo.org/STF/A9011182/en

Candidates must submit the following documents:

  • on-line application form duly fi lled in;
  • letter indicating fi nancial support (or letter from applicant stating that participation cost are covered by him/herself) uploaded when submitting the on-line application.

Incomplete fi les will not be considered.

As an organization dedicated to fundamental human rights and social justice, the ILO is taking a leading role in international efforts to promote gender equality and non-discrimination.
In line with this ILO focus, male candidates are particularly welcome to apply in this course.

Payment modalities for sponsored participants

The training costs must be paid in advance before the beginning of the course by the participant or his/her sponsoring organization through bank transfer or credit card.

Payments by bank transfer, should be made to:

International Training Centre of the ILO
Account no. 560002
Bank: Intesa San Paolo Ag. 523
IBAN: IT96 G 03069 09214 100000560002
BIC: BCITITMM
Address: Viale Maestri del Lavoro 10,
10127 Turin, Italy


Note: on the bank transfer form, the participant’s name and the course code should be stated.

For payments by credit card, please e-mail to gend@itcilo.org

Contact us

gend@itcilo.org

Tuition cost: 1600

Subsistence cost: 615

Total cost: 2215

 

International Training Centre of the ILO

Viale Maestri del Lavoro, 10
10127 Turin - Italy

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