en

02 December 2019 - 06 December 2019

Access to labour markets for refugees and other forcibly displaced persons

02 December 2019 - 06 December 2019

Access to labour markets for refugees and other forcibly displaced persons

Access to labour markets for refugees and other forcibly displaced persons

Course Information

02 December 2019 - 06 December 2019

English

Turin Centre

Code: A9012031

Enrolment deadline: 02 November 2019

facebook twitter google plus linkedin whatsapp

Description

Description

Globally, more than 68.5 million people are forcibly displaced by conflict, violence and human rights violations, overwhelmingly in emerging economies. This is more than at any time since World War II. As displacement becomes increasingly protracted, cities may offer better economic prospects than camps and rural areas. But access to urban labour markets is usually constrained by refugees' unclear legal status and degree of enjoyment of economic and social rights. Competition in the highly crowded informal economy, where most forcibly displaced people look for work, can also result in unfair competition for unauthorized and unprotected jobs. The wider socio-economic consequences of forced displacement have triggered intense debates globally on how to develop appropriate and sustainable policy responses to these challenges. Based on the ILO's guiding principles on the access of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons to the labour market, as well as ILO standards and other human-rights instruments and existing good practices, this course aims to strengthen the capacity of policy-makers and practitioners in adopting measures to facilitate the access of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons to the labour market.

Target audience

Target audience

The course is aimed at the following groups: policy-planners and officials from government institutions and agencies dealing with refugees and forcibly displaced people, and responsible for labour market policies; representatives of workers' and employers' organizations; staff of NGOs and civil society organizations, and activists working with refugees at grass-roots level; staff of international development agencies and regional economic communities; researchers and academics working on the migration crisis.

Course overview

Course overview

This course aims to provide a practical overview of existing normative guidance on access by refugees and other forcibly displaced persons to the labour market, highlighting why access to employment and decent work is essential to sustainable responses to forced displacement, and exposing participants to policy responses and practical tools that can be adapted to specific contexts.

The course will draw on the ILO’s and partner organizations’ experience in supporting refugees’ access to decent work and sustainable livelihoods, as well as country-led experiences in addressing labour market challenges and improving employment opportunities. Participants are therefore encouraged to share their own professional experiences.

Context

Context

Since 2012, the number of forcibly displaced people has risen sharply and in 2017, the United Nations officially documented some 68.5 million people forcibly displaced by conflict, violence, persecution human rights violations but also natural disasters and the effects of climate change. This number does not account for potentially millions more forcibly displaced persons who are not recorded in official and/or verified data sources.

While the majority of displaced populations remain within the border of their own countries as internally displaced people (IDPs), large cross border movements are mostly contained in neighbouring countries, many of which are emerging economies and, in some cases, themselves   affected by situation of fragility, conflict and violence. Prolonged displacement impacts countries of origin, transit and destination, as well as the international community and implies a heavy economic and social burden for both host communities and displaced populations themselves.  

In many emerging economies and low and middle income countries hosting large displaced populations, access to formal and decent work remains an issue for citizens.  The impact of forcibly displaced populations on labour markets largely depends on the policy and legislative framework that can either facilitate or restrict the right to work. At the same time, actual access to the labour market for refugees and other forcibly displaced populations is mediated by a range of socioeconomic factors. Even when host governments facilitate access to decent work opportunities, the number of refugees who are able to access employment in the formal economy remains limited. A highly crowded informal economy results in unfair competition between refugees and native-born/workers from the host community and, in some contexts, regular migrant workers, IDPs, and returnees.  Moreover, the precarious situation of these populations renders them vulnerable to discriminatory practices, which can lead to exploitation and denial of fundamental rights at work, as well as other serious human rights violations.

Protracted displacement and the incapacity of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons to access employment and livelihoods can also lead to other socioeconomic impacts, such as strain on public services including health, transport, housing and education. These pressures and competition for jobs can translate into social tensions between host and refugee populations, especially in already poorly served and overcrowded urban areas, where an increasing number of refugees are settling, attracted by the better economic prospects that cities tend to offer.

At the same time, there is widespread recognition that refugees and other forcibly displaced persons can contribute to host societies through their skills, talent, competencies, extensive social capital and a high level of entrepreneurial spirit that can foster the positive development of host communities. Refugees and displaced persons can also help meet labour shortages due to changing demographics, such as ageing populations and declining workforces, as well as changing skills profiles.

Recognition of the wider socioeconomic consequences of protracted and large scale forced displacement has prompted a shift towards development-oriented responses that complement, transition from, and build on humanitarian assistance. The right to work and access to decent and productive employment for refugee and host communities alike are core elements of such responses. These can also contribute towards wider objectives of peace and security and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.  Recent responses in a number of countries have incorporated labour market-based measures, effectively bridging the humanitarian-development divide, and providing a solid evidence base and lessons learned to support future interventions.

At the global level, the growing consensus on the instrumental role of employment and income generation in addressing displacement is reflected in the Global Compact for Refugees endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in December 2018, as well as the Employment and Decent Work for Peace and Resilience Recommendation (No. 205), adopted by the International Labour Conference in June 2017. These instruments, together with the Guiding Principles on the Access of Refugees and Other Forcibly Displaced Persons to the Labour Market adopted by the ILO Governing Body in November 2016, provide comprehensive operational guidance on the access of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons to the labour market, based on underlying principles of shared responsibility, cooperation, and respect for human rights.

Objectives

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Identify specific challenges and opportunities, including the gender dimension, to refugees and other forcibly displaced persons’ access to decent work and self-reliance
  • Comprehend and utilize the international human rights and refugee legal framework, including fundamental principles and rights at work, and other relevant international labour standards to effectively ensure refugees’ right to work, protect their rights at work and improve their working conditions
  • Assess relevant policy options to govern labour market access for refugees and other forcibly displaced persons
  • Promote short- and long-term strategies for employment creation and the inclusion of refugees in the formal labour market
  • Access tools and methodologies to address the labour market impact of refugees and promote employment-based responses to refugee situations

Content

Content

The course is divided into five main parts:

  • Introduction to key concepts and dynamics related to forced displacement,  the impact of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons on labour markets and means  of providing access to employment and working conditions
  • Protection and decent working conditions: international legal and normative framework on refugee law,  human rights law and labour standards, including social protection, occupational safety and health, and labour inspection
  • Governance of access to labour markets: developing and implementing enabling policy, legal and administrative frameworks
  • Inclusive employment strategies: strengthening public employment services, addressing informality, skills recognition and development, additional pathways for labour mobility, reintegration of returnees
  • Engagement with partners at the local, national, and international level: the role of employers and workers’ organizations, engaging with development assistance actors, inter-State cooperation

Format and Methodology

Format and Methodology

The ITC promotes a three-phase approach in its learning activities:

  • Pre-training phase (online platform): two weeks before the face-to-face (residential) phase, participants can access initial information on the course contents and follow an introductory module and exercises.
  • Face-to-face phase (residential):An action-oriented, highly participatory learning approach will be used, with particular attention devoted to sharing international experiences and “good practices” with a view to their adaptation and practical application. Training methods combine lectures and discussions, case studies, open space debates, role-play exercises and group work.
  • Follow-up phase (online platform): participants can access course material, as well as new resources online, and can continue to discuss and consult with other participants and experts via the discussion Forum of the online platform.

Language requirements

Language requirements

The course will be held in English. 

How to apply

How to apply

Applicants should complete the online nomination form no later than 02 November 2019, supported by a nomination letter from the sponsoring institution indicating how the participant will be financed. The form can be found here.

Please note that if a Schengen visa for Italy is needed, the time required is on average at least three weeks.

Tuition cost: 1615

Subsistence cost: 635

Total cost: 2250

 

International Training Centre of the ILO

Viale Maestri del Lavoro, 10
10127 Turin - Italy

Contact us